School of Business Research
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 School of Business Research

In School of Business of the Singapore University of Social Sciences, we aim to create and disseminate knowledge to improve competiveness of organisations in Singapore and to educate business leaders. 

Our areas of research include economics, marketing, logistics and supply chain management, analytics, business excellence and others. While diverse, there is one thing in common in our research - we work actively with executives and managers from the industry to solve real-world business problems.

Highlights of our research success include winning several awards in recent international conferences/competition.
 

Selected Initiatives & Projects



SBIZ Brown Bag Seminars

​Date
Research Details
29 March 2017
(Wednesday)

Topic: The Business of Religion is Political: Thai Buddhism in Late Modernity

Abstract:
How does the Buddhist sangha function in Thailand today? Does the new monarch Rama X believe that the Sangha is an obstacle to the development of the most important religion in Thailand? It is widely known that the Buddhist people love and worship the Buddha and that at least 93.4% are nominal Buddhists and over 55% are practising Buddhists from the Theravada sect. Given this fact, and the other that there are so many Buddhists in Thailand, why isn’t Buddhism the national religion since the majority of Thai and ancient Siamese people are Buddhists? This paper traces the main arguments raised by local and farang Thai scholars about the evolution of Siamese and Thai Buddhism since the 13th century. The paper concludes with the reasons why Thai people had rejected certain beliefs but accepted others. The presentation shows how the business of religion in Thailand is in effect political.

Speaker:
Assoc Prof Antonio L Rappa
Head, Management & Security Studies Program

7 December 2016
(Wednesday)


Topic: The Effect of Funding Programs and How to Get Funded: Observations from an Eclectic Economist

Abstract:
Singaporean researchers face an embarrassment of riches when it comes to research funding. Yet, while some researchers have more funding than they can use, others languish in funding deserts. I will present early research findings from an NRF-funded research project that estimates the returns to funding early-career “Star” scientists through the NRF Fellowship program. The NRF Fellowship program provides up to 3 million SGD over 5 years for research in Science, Technology, and Engineering, and is one of Singapore’s flagship scientific funding programs aimed at attracting top young researchers to Singapore. We estimate the causal impact of being awarded a large early-career grant by using the NRF Fellowship’s highly selective award process as a source of quasi-experimental variation. We find that NRF fellows have a sustained increase in aggregate publication output, particularly in independent, highly cited work.

Speaker:
Dr Walter Edgar Theseira
Senior Lecturer, Business Programme
9 November 2016
(Wednesday)
Topic: Do Losses Bite More than Gains? Evidence from a Panel Quantile Regression Analysis of Subjective Well-being in Japan[1]

Abstract:
This paper conducts an empirical analysis of the distributional effects of the determinants of happiness by applying quantile regression techniques to panel data from the “Preference Parameters Study” of Osaka University, a nationally representative survey conducted in Japan.

The key question examined in the paper is whether we observe an asymmetry between the effects of positive and negative changes on individual happiness, and if it exists, whether it is observed uniformly across the happiness distribution. Such an asymmetry is referred to as “loss aversion” in prospect theory. Loss aversion effects are analyzed with respect to relative income as well as expected and actual income changes. We find that feeling relatively poor has a greater negative effect on happiness than the positive effect of feeling relatively rich, i.e., losses bite more than gains. The degree of loss aversion with respect to relative income was found to increase as we move down the happiness distribution. However, no evidence for loss aversion is detected with respect to income changes, though the happiness of the relatively unhappy is found to be affected more by losses than by equivalent gains.

Speaker:
Dr Fang Zheng
Lecturer, Business Programme


10 March 2016
(Thursday)


Topic: Beyond Containers: Building Relationships with Students, Alumni and Industry – Case Study of the Logistics and Supply Chain Management Programme

Abstract:
One of the biggest challenges facing our part-time programmes is the sense of disconnect with our students. Our part-time students have busy schedules with work and family. We have limited time in the classroom to engage them (six sessions of F2F for conventional courses, only three for e-courses). Apart from the seminar sessions for which attendance is not compulsory, there are few opportunities for students to bond with one another, with faculty and associates. Once they graduate, there are even fewer opportunities for them to keep in touch.

In this seminar, I will examine how the Logistics and Supply Chain Management programme tries to humanise the programme and build bridges with our students, graduates and industry, given the limited resources we have. I will present a conceptual framework of engagement for the end-to-end supply chain education and will share examples, that in my opinion, worked well for the progra
mme.

Speaker:
Assoc Prof Tan Yan Weng
Head, Logistics & Supply Chain Management Programme
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