Singapore University of Social Sciences

Environmental Hazards and Toxicology

Environmental Hazards and Toxicology (HFS203)

Applications Open: 01 April 2021

Applications Close: 31 May 2021

Next Available Intake: July 2021

Course Types: Modular Undergraduate Course

Language: English

Duration: 6 months

Fees: $1514 View More Details on Fees

Area of Interest: Science & Technology

Schemes: Alumni Continuing Education + (ACE+), Lifelong Learning Credit (L2C), Resilience

Funding: SkillsFuture

School/Department: School of Science & Technology


Synopsis

Human-environmental interaction forms an important component in a human factors programme. It is imperative for human factors and safety practitioners to appreciate how human performance is affected by physical environmental factors such as lighting, thermal, noise, and vibration. This course will cover these topics as well as how human performs in high and low altitude environments. Students are taught to recognize problems in the physical environment in relation to human responses and how to alleviate these problems.

Level: 2
Credit Units: 5
Presentation Pattern: Every July

Topics

  • Noise
  • Climate
  • Motion
  • Illumination
  • Toxicology and Radiation
  • Human Performance in Extreme Environments

Learning Outcome

  • Discuss the different environmental hazards and their effects on the human worker in various work environments.
  • Explain the basic principles of control of occupational hazards, using the Hierarchy of Control pyramid for the various hazards.
  • Illustrate how human factors principles, activities and programmes can be applied to ensure safety and health at work through appropriate measures.
  • Identify the various hazards at work, and be able to take necessary measures to gather data and propose solutions.
  • Apply the Hierarchy of control principles for the prevention of adverse effects of environmental hazards on workers.
  • Analyse key environmental hazards concerns and their implications with respect to real world applications.
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