Singapore University of Social Sciences

Play-Based Early Education in Anji

Play-Based Early Education in Anji (OEL327)

Applications Open: To be confirmed

Applications Close: To be confirmed

Next Available Intake: To be confirmed

Course Types: To be confirmed

Language: English

Duration: 6 months

Fees: To be confirmed

Area of Interest: Others

Schemes: To be confirmed

Funding: To be confirmed

School/Department: College of Lifelong & Experiential Learning


Level: 3
Credit Units: 5
Presentation Pattern: Every July

Topics

  • Experiential learning.
  • Inquiry learning.
  • Key historical and socio-cultural developments of early childhood education in Anji and in China as a whole.
  • Key historical and socio-cultural developments of early childhood education in Singapore.
  • Key historical and socio-cultural developments of early childhood education in the western world.
  • Selected issues on the use of play in early childhood education.
  • Cultural conceptions of work.
  • Cultural conceptions of play.
  • Universality of play-based education in ECE.
  • Cultural particularity of play-based education in ECE.
  • Cultural sensitivity in engagement in overseas study work.
  • Preparation and design of the overseas experiential learning project: liaising with local community partner(s), safety and emergency response

Learning Outcome

  • Compare the socio-cultural circumstances shaping play-based education in Anji to that of Singapore
  • Examine how the issues and challenges faced by preschool teachers in implementing play-based education in Anji County are similar and/or different from those faced by preschool teachers in Singapore.
  • Apply ECE theories of play to cultural vs. universal conceptions of play.
  • Evaluate the relationships between play-based education and cultural conceptions of work vs. play.
  • Analyse the universality and particularity of the role that play holds in early childhood education.
  • Assess the effectiveness of play-based education in the Anji preschools.
  • Modify own beliefs about play-based education.
Back to top
Back to top