Singapore University of Social Sciences

Transforming Work

Transforming Work (SCO105)

Applications Open: To be confirmed

Applications Close: To be confirmed

Next Available Intake: To be confirmed

Course Types: To be confirmed

Language: English

Duration: 6 months

Fees: To be confirmed

Area of Interest: Others

Schemes: To be confirmed

Funding: To be confirmed

School/Department: College of Lifelong & Experiential Learning


Synopsis

The nature of work and our perceptions about work have changed considerably with globalisationand technological advancements. Not only have many traditional jobs been phased out or substitutedby automation, jobs created in the new economy also need to adapt to flexible work hours, multipleand borderless work locations, and contingent employment (e.g., contract work and freelancing).This course brings students through the changing nature and design of work, to a consideration ofthe future of work. It allows them to reflect on the significance of work and labour, with attentionpaid to workers who provide goods and services essential to the functioning of society, considerissues of inequality and precarity, and evaluate the impact of acquiring life-long skills whileproviding a spotlight on work contexts in Singapore and the ASEAN region.

Level: 1
Credit Units: 2.5
Presentation Pattern: Every semester

Topics

  • Hierarchies of work and occupation in different labour contexts
  • Labour as an extension of the worker: effort and property
  • The Alienation of Labour
  • Machines and the Future of Work
  • Work, Diversity and Inequality
  • New Forms of Work

Learning Outcome

  • Outline the evolving nature and design of work and workplace.
  • State the impacts of technology and globalisation on the nature and design of work.
  • Explain the effects of work through a sociological perspective.
  • Discuss the value of work in contemporary society.
  • Describe the nature and perception of work in local contexts.
  • Show how socio-economic factors affect the work of foreign and local workers in Singapore.
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